Date of Award

12-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Learning Technologies and Media Systems

First Advisor

Richard Kordel, D.Ed.

Abstract

Digital information is omnipresent, and access is almost unavoidable. Technology advances and comes at us in waves that take over and then tend to linger. iGen is the first generation to be born into this advanced technology and the state of constant “plugged-inness” to the Internet. iGen has not experienced a different, predominantly analog, world, but baby boomers, generation X, and millennials – many of whom now use Internet-connected technology heavily – can attest to how they have changed as it integrated into their lives. Along with many other areas of life, learning has also changed with technological progress. From analog learning to digital – pre-iGen generations can describe the difference. Having not experienced the transition and therefore being unable to describe the difference, how does iGen learn, what does it learn based on the way it learns, and who drives and inspires iGen to learn more, and what are some traits that iGen and millennials share? This autoethnographic research seeks to examine iGen, millennials, pop culture, learning, technology, and the Internet with the purpose of assessing and helping to assess how iGen’ers learn information using technology based on whom they learn from, while also attempting to take a closer look at and at least begin to answer these questions. Keywords

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